Tableaux Sceniques

Provenance & History

16th Century

Chabannes Millefleur

c.1480-1510. An Aubusson tapestry. Permanent collection of the museum of the Cité Internationale de la Tapisserie, Aubusson, France.
‘Chabannes Millefleurs’ is drawn from the oldest known tapestry of the Aubusson region. The original is a heraldic tapestry, depicting the Chabannes family coat of arms against a floral background. This “millefleur”, or “thousand flowers” design is typical of this period; however, the extreme geometric placement of the flowers and foliage makes this tapestry unique among other “millefleur” designs. In Chabannes, which focuses upon the floral ground, the front-facing pattern is organised in staggered vertical bands visually create an almost honeycomb effect
Provenance & History
Provenance & History

Aristoloche

c.1550. A Flemish Feuilles d'Aristoloche tapestry. From a private collection at Château de Walzin in Belgium.
Verdure tapestry is a design based on foliage, flowers and plant forms that was originally characterised by its green tones, whcih gained popularity in the 16th century. Their popularity in turn spawned the "Feuilles géantes" Verdure tapestries, which translates as greeneries with large leaves. This new style featured a liberal interpretation of acanthus leaves and aristolochia (cabbage) leaves, often against a woodland scene and accompanied by birds or animals, adorned with fruits and floral decoration.
A quintessential example of mid 16th century “Feuilles géantes” (also referred to as “Feuilles de choux”, “Verdure à feuillages crispés” or “Feuilles d’aristoloche” tapestries) our Aristoloche design depicts acanthus and aristolochia leaves against a woodland scene.

17th Century

Cardaillac

1624, an Aubusson Tapestry. Permanent collection of the museum of the Cité Internationale de la Tapisserie Aubusson, France.
The originally tapestry was woven as a wedding gift to commemorate the marriage of Henri-Victor de Cardaillac and Élisabeth de Pluvinel in 1624. A highly symbolic tapestry, the original depicts a united coat of arms, which gracefully blends the de Cardaillac and de Pluvinel family crests, and is decorated with a monogram comprised of the initials E and H. Focusing on the original tapestry’s stylised floral backdrop, our Cardaillac Tableau Scénique is imbued with elegant celebration. Recalling 17th century Dutch Still Life paintings, stately bouquets, each a different arrangement of carnations, lilies, roses and arums, are arranged in unique vases upon a striking plain ground.
Provenance & History
Provenance & History

Wolterton Verdure

Mid-17th Century. A suite of five Soho or Antwerp tapestries. Private Collection of Wolterton Hall.
This suite of five Verdure tapestries were brought to Wolterton Hall by Horatio Walpole in the mid-18th century. Whilst the origin of this suite is unknown, it is likely to be of either Soho or Antwerp tapestry weavers. Originally set up in Mortlake and established during the 17th Century under royal patronage, many workshops moved to Soho through the 18th Century. The Mortlake manufactory recruited around fifty Flemish weavers and thus created a crossover of British and Flemish craftsmanship. 
This suite of tapestries presents the mythological love story of Venus and Adonis, a narrative originally written by Ovid in his Metamorphoses, but made popular by William Shakespeare in his famous 1593 poem of the same name. Depicting the Goddess, Venus’s attempts to seduce a handsome but reluctant young man, each of the five tapesties relates a different scene within Shakespeare's illustrious tale.
Provenance & History
Provenance & History
Provenance & History
Provenance & History

Jardin d'Ussé Dormant

17th Century. A pair of Oudenaarde Tapestries. Private Collection of the Château d’Ussé.
Taken from two 17th century Verdure tapestries woven in the Flemish municipality of Oudenaarde, famous for its tapestry weaving, Jardin d’Ussé Dormant Frima depicts a medieval castle nestled within a softly stirring landscape. Celebrating the serenity and romance of nature, the original tapestries hang within the languid walls of the Château d’Ussé of the Loire Valley. Originally built for the influential de Buiel family, the Château d’Ussé was sold in 1455 to Jacques d’Espinay, chamberlain to King Charles VII of France, who set about renovating the existing Gothic structure in the new Renaissance style. Romantically combining Gothic and Renaissance aesthetics, the Château d'Ussé is recognisable as a "fairy-tale" castle, inspiring Charles Perrault his write his famous version of the conte de fée, Sleeping Beauty.
 

18th Century

Teniers

Early-18th Century. A suite of three Brussels Teniers tapestries. Private Collection of Wolterton Hall.
Named after the renowned Flemish Baroque painter, David Teniers II (1610-1690), Teniers Tapestries illustrate rustic and celebratory scenes from peasant life. An extremely versatile artist, Teniers is most celebrated for his peasant scenes, though his prolific output also spans history painting, genre painting, landscape painting, portrait and still life. Teniers tapestries were extremely popular in the late 17th and early 18th centuries, with workshops producing large numbers of weavings. Produced throughout Europe, they include designs depicting fisherman, shepherds, archers, farmyards and the Kermesse (al fresco party scenes), the latter of which were by far the most popular. This charismatic bucolic suite, attributed to Flemish weaver Josse de Vos (1661-1734), hangs within the walls of Wolterton Hall, one of the four grand "Power Houses" of Norfolk, built in 1742 by Horace Walpole.
 
Provenance & History
Provenance & History
Provenance & History

Birds of Paradise

1748. An Aubusson tapestry. Permanent collection of the museum of the Cité Internationale de la Tapisserie Aubusson, France.
Commissioned by Heinrich, Count von Brühl (1700-1763), the influential Polish-Saxon statesman and member of the powerful von Brühl family, the cartoon for this vibrant tapestry was created by the first “Painter of the King” at Aubusson, Jean-Joseph Dumons (1687-1779). Famous for adapting existing paintings into tapestries at the Beauvais manufactory, this tapestry is typical in style of the late Baroque period and includes the House of Brühl coat of arms. Inspired by the work of French Rococo painter, Jean-Baptiste Oudry (1686-1755), this naturalistic tapestry, presents a wooded scene, peppered with a vibrant array of exotic birds.
 

Daphnis and Chloe

Mid-late 18th Century. A suite of six Aubusson tapestries. Permanent collection of the museum of the Cité Internationale de la Tapisserie.
Created by Étienne Jeaurat (1699-1789), custodian to King Louis XV and XVI’s collections of paintings at Versailles, this suite of six vibrant tapestries are unique amongst Aubusson creations. The weaving technique is notable both for being incredibly precise and for its use of fresh colours. The original tapestries also feature an inverted weave, which is unusual for an Aubusson tapestry and is more often associated with Les Gobelins, the company’s main tapestry-making rival. Based on the pastoral narrative composed by the Greek poet Longus in the second century A.D., the suite relays the triumphs and tragedies of two young lovers, Daphnis and Chloe. Influenced by the glorious frivolity of Rococo painters such as Boucher, Fragonard and Watteau, these beautifully devorative tapestries are comprised of five "Panel" tapestries, and culminate with "Les Noces de Daphnis et Chloe", a large lanscape tapestry which celebrates the couple's wedding.
 
Provenance & History
Provenance & History

Walzin Chinoiserie

Late-18th Century. Hand-painted Chinoiserie paper. Private Collection of the Château de Walzin.
The late-18th century was the golden age of chinoiserie wall-coverings and the enthusiasm for Chinese styles was reflected in their widespread use in 18th-century decoration. There was a playfulness and informality to the style that made chinoiserie a universally popular choice. The Walzin Chinoiserie is known to have been part of the private collection of the 9th Duke and Duchess of Norfolk and may well have been used in the redecoration of Norfolk House, St James Square, London (1748-52). Gifted by the Duke of Norfolk in the 1780s, this original Chinoiserie paper adorned the walls of the elegant Stoke House of Newark for centuries. The paper was then purchased by the owners of the remarkably beautiful Château de Walzin of Belgium in the 1920s, and has graced the same walls ever since.
 
Provenance & History

Ussé Chinoiserie

Late-18th Century. Hand-painted Chinoiserie paper. Private collection of the Château d’Ussé.
Sourced directly from China in the late 18th Century, the Ussé Chinoiserie was purchased to adorn the languid walls of Château d’Ussé of the Loire Valley. Originally built for the influential de Buiel family, the Château d’Ussé is a romantic combination of Gothic and Renaissance aesthetics. Inspiring Charles Perrault his write his famous version of the conte de fée, Sleeping Beauty, the Château d'Ussé is universally recognised as a "fairy-tale" castle. In the 18th century hand painted Chinoiserie was the most coveted fashion of aristocratic interiors, and this original hand painted paper decorates the Grandmother's bedroom within the Château. Teeming with oriental energy, Ussé Chinoiserie depicts an astonishing botanical array, myriad fruits and leaf formations dance between elegant, patterned urns. 

 
Provenance & History
Provenance & History